The Dissent Newswire

January 12, 2012

The other Guantánamo: US accused of mistreatment of Bagram detainees again

The US-run prison at Bagram Air Force Base in Afghanistan has been accused once again of violating detainee’s human rights by Afghan leaders. This comes after a government investigation into the prison, where widespread abuses have been documented before. Of
January 11, 2012

Celebrating the Bill of Rights at Occupy Tacoma

As 2011 drew to a close, grassroots groups around the country rose their voices to defend the Bill of Rights on December 15, designated as Bill of Rights Day by President Roosevelt 70 years before. In Tacoma, WA, last month’s
January 9, 2012

January 11: National Day of Action Against Guantánamo

This Wednesday marks the 10th year since the start of illegal detention in Guantánamo Bay. Despite evidence of widespread torture and deprivation of due process for many detainees, the United States has continued to keep the doors open. Two recent accounts
January 7, 2012

Texas teen reunited with family after mistaken deportation

As if the FBI’s Next Generation Initiative (a plan to use immigrant deportation as political bait to impose a biometric national ID system on all Americans, including citizens) weren’t creepy enough, the Washington Post reported a bizarre story today further reflecting the
January 3, 2012

What comes next? The future of the NDAA

This is the third in a three-part FAQ about the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  See Part I: “The NDAA: Another Assault in the Dead of Night” and Part II: “Torture enabling expanded detention: The NDAA in context” The first
January 1, 2012

Obama’s last act of 2011: allowing indefinite detention

Today, on the last day of 2011, President Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act despite acknowledging “serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists.” The NDAA codifies military detention without trial for
January 1, 2012

Obama’s last act of 2011: allowing indefinite detention

Today, on the last day of 2011, President Obama signed the National Defense Authorization Act despite acknowledging “serious reservations with certain provisions that regulate the detention, interrogation, and prosecution of suspected terrorists.” The NDAA codifies military detention without trial for
December 27, 2011

Torture enabling expanded detention: the NDAA in context

This is the second in a three-part FAQ about the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  See Part I: “The NDAA: Another Assault in the Dead of Night” and Part III: “What comes next? The future of the NDAA.” As I
December 23, 2011

The NDAA: Another assault in the dead of night

This is the first in a three-part FAQ about the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).  See Part II: “Torture enabling expanded detention: The NDAA in context” and Part III: “What comes next? The future of the NDAA.” Ten years ago,
December 20, 2011

Stop the NDAA: Demand a veto!

Last week, Congress gave final approval to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), despite the fact that it allows the president to put “any person who has committed a belligerent act” in military detention. By giving Obama and any future
December 14, 2011

Bill of Rights Day celebrations across the country!

Tomorrow, December 15, is Bill of Rights Day. Each year on this date, we mark the anniversary of the ratification of the first ten amendments to the Constitution. But this year, there’s even more reason to celebrate Bill of Rights
December 6, 2011

This Bill of Rights Day, stand with us to stop the NDAA

Our nation celebrates Bill of Rights Day every December 15, the anniversary of the ratification of the first ten amendments to the Constitution. But last week—just two weeks before Bill of Rights Day—Congress passed the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). As
November 28, 2011

Senator Lieberman asks Google to censor “terrorist” content

Senator Joe Lieberman (I-CT) wrote to Google CEO Larry Page this week, asking the company to block “terrorist” content from all of their platforms, specifically Blogger, according to a letter obtained by Talking Points Memo. The letter also calls for
November 28, 2011

Senator Lieberman asks Google to censor “terrorist” content

Senator Joe Lieberman (I-CT) wrote to Google CEO Larry Page this week, asking the company to block “terrorist” content from all of their platforms, specifically Blogger, according to a letter obtained by Talking Points Memo. The letter also calls for
November 27, 2011

Military detention versus We the People

Congress has a deserved reputation for cluelessness. Our leaders have a habit of ignoring real crises like housing, education, mass incarceration, and climate change, while contriving distractions like the budget debate that essentially froze Washington, DC for the past year.
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